NatGeo Kids is ‘Weird But True’ in Alaska

Got curiosity? Join us at NatGeo Kids Weird But True - Alaska on the AKontheGO Kids Corner. Erin Kirkland/AKontheGO

Got curiosity? Join us at NatGeo Kids Weird But True – Alaska on the AKontheGO Kids Corner. Erin Kirkland/AKontheGO

As soon as I could read, my mother bought a subscription to a little magazine called “World.” Designed to create a more kid-friendly approach to issues facing a 1970’s planet, World filled my head with images, people, and ideas that I’d like to think shaped my teen and adult years. Today’s World is now National Geographic Kids (age 6 and up) and National Geographic Little Kids (for the younger explorer age 3-6), but the same commitment to science, nature, people, and events means “NatGeo kids” around the world can become stewards of this place we all call home.

Technology’s expansion into the collective consciousness of today’s children also means there are more ways to learn, and one is through a new program titled Weird But True, airing in the Lower 48 states on Fox network stations. Alaska youngsters don’t have the opportunity to watch hosts Charlie and Kirby Engleman experience and experiment with all the amazing things that make our world turn, but AKontheGO and a team of Alaska-based destinations and people have jumped on board to help.

Introducing “Weird But True – Alaska,” found only at the AKontheGO.com Kids Corner. While we can’t show an entire episode of the series (airing Saturdays, by the way, in case you live or visit somewhere with the program), we can bring AKontheGO readers a dose of NatGeo Kids with a decidedly Alaska twist.

Tutka Bay Lodge naturalist Karyn Traphagen explains about foraging skills. Erin Kirkland/AKontheGO

Tutka Bay Lodge naturalist Karyn Traphagen explains about foraging skills. Erin Kirkland/AKontheGO

Who’s in on this so far?

Tutka Bay Lodge near Homer, Alaska. Recognized as a National Geographic Lodge of Distinction, Tutka Bay is dedicated to the wild, natural elements of Alaska that are indeed sometimes very weird. Like this mushroom with a stem that turns BLUE when exposed to air, acting sort of like nature’s “warning system” to tell us not to eat this one!<—-check out the YouTube video HERE. Naturalist Karyn Traphagen is not just a cool guide at Tutka Bay; she’s also a scientist in her own right with a desire to help kids be the most curious explorers they can. She even has her own blog called, what else? Stay Curious. Watch for amazing facts about the 49th state as WBT AK grows.

Manitoba Hut and Yurts is the place to be for Family Fun Camp on October 8-9 (that’s not very far away) and a National Park Service 100th birthday party! In cooperation with Camp Fire Alaska, AKontheGO and NatGeo Kids are planning a cool cupcake-infused, activity-filled afternoon to say “thanks” for all the Park Service does for us. We still have room, so sign up HERE. We’ll also be looking for some weird stuff in the forest!

Would you like to be part of the Weird But True – Alaska scene? AKontheGO is in search of naturalists, scientists, interpretive staff or anyone else with an interest in our state’s crazy-cool plants, animals, geology, archeology, astronomy. If it shows up in Alaska, it works. The weirder, the better.

Why are we doing this? Kids are curious. NatGeo is a longtime vehicle for curiosity. Alaska is full of incredible things. Let’s create something together for the future of all three.

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Who would have thought a porcupine could have that many quills? Perhaps your unfortunate dog after an encounter?

 

Did you know? NatGeo Kids Weird But True fact.

Wait, WHAT? No BRAINS? Truth, says NatGeo Kids.

~EK

 

final-insider-logo-hi-res Erin Kirkland is a NatGeo Kids Insider, providing opportunities, information, and experiences related to the natural world. 

 

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  1. Pingback: Weird But True -- At the Alaska Zoo! - AK on the GO

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